Posts Tagged “aperture”

By Kaleigh Rusgrove, PRC Intern

Paolo Ventura, “Behind the Walls 2,” photograph; Courtesy of the Barbara Krakow Gallery, Boston

(Work from Ventura’s series Behind the Walls was recently featured at the Barbara Krakow Gallery in Boston (September 10 – October 9, 2014). Behind the Walls is also the subject and title of a book published by Aperture. Ventura is currently showing his series The Infinite City at Atlas Gallery in London.)

Viewing Paolo Ventura’s first Boston show, Behind the Walls, is much like getting lost in a great story. It is easy to find yourself standing in front of the prints and imaging that the wall may open up and you might join Ventura in this mystifying created world. Standing in the small side room of the Barbara Krakow gallery, I found myself enthralled by these images of a place that seemed familiar and unknown all at once. Ventura’s work is inspiring on many levels, not only because of his gift as a visual narrator but also because of his incredible attention to detail. In Behind the Walls, Ventura has truly mastered his craft in creating miniatures and false realities.

Italian native Paolo Ventura began his career in the 1990’s after studying at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera in Milan. Ventura worked in Italy as a fashion photographer for many years before deciding to move to New York City. It was there that Ventura began making miniatures, staging dolls inside of them, and photographing the created sets. In his first series (War Souvenir, Winter Stories, The Automaton), Ventura worked primarily with dolls as subjects. Now skilled in his practice, Ventura has entered into his own world and is the main character in his newest story, Behind the Walls.

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Following Minneapolis Star Tribune arts writer Mary Abbe’s bracing, or “lush” as one PRC blog reader opined, words about a major traveling exhibition (posted July 8 in this blog, with a comment added today), come Andy Grundberg’s comparably questioning observations in the Summer 2010 Aperture, issue number 199. And now noted scholar, writer, and critic David Levi Strauss has posted an entry on Aperture‘s blog taking Grundberg and his review to task. We all know that celebrity gossip, lolcats, YouTube videos, and sports fanaticism whipsaw virally across the ‘net; it’s good to see a lively forum for exchanges in photographic arts criticism settling in as well. (Link here for Strauss’ entry on Aperture‘s “Exposures” blog, and a link to Grundberg’s review.)

Also, reader Lauri Robertson sent me a link to a posting on another blog about the Grundberg/Strauss interaction. Find it [on (Notes on) Politics, Theory & Photography] here.

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Believe me, I’m the last person who wants to rush the summer along (despite today’s oppressive heat and no home air conditioning). But having just confirmed our fall speakers I can now say that I won’t be quite so despondent after the last leaves have fallen. We have the pleasure of hosting some pretty amazing artists this fall and I wanted to share the news.

Below is the list of folks and the corresponding dates of their lectures. But please keep in mind that dates may be subject to change so always check back to prcboston.org, for the most current information.


Polaroid Spotlight Lecture featuring Barbara Crane
Thursday, October 23
The depth and breadth of work Barbara has produced is staggering. There’s not many people out there who can move so deftly between styles, materials, subjects, formats, etc., etc., as Barbara. Truly a Renaissance photographer!


Paul Fusco

Thursday, November 13
One of the great Magnum photographers, Paul Fusco has traveled the world covering the stories that have defined our generation, including Robert F. Kennedy’s assasination and subsequent funeral train procession. He’ll share pictures from that story, which are included in his new book Paul Fusco: RFK, soon to be released by Aperture. A show of this work is currently up at Danziger Projects and was recently featured in the New York Times Magazine.


Larry Fink
Thursday, December 11
Check out Fink’s current show and latest body of work, The Democrats, at Pace/MacGill Gallery. He’s applied that candid aesthetic, that we all came to know and love from his work covering black tie affairs in New York City, to the recent Democratic nomination campaign trail.

Image Credits, Top to bottom:
Barbara Crane, Santa Barbara and Refrigerator, “On the Fence” series, Tucson, Arizona, 1980, 8 x 10 inches
Paul Fusco/Magnum Photos USA. 1968, Robert KENNEDY funeral train
Larry Fink, Hillary Clinton, NC and IN, 2008. Gelatin silver print paper, 24 x 20 inches

The Polaroid Spotlight Lecture is sponsored by the Land Fund of the Polaroid Foundation

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In this feature, we showcase an image per week from our current exhibition, EXPOSURE: 13th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition, juried by Aperture’s Lesley A. Martin. In celebration of the last weeks of the show, we increased the frequency (and the excitement). This is the last image!

Today is the last day to see the PRC Juried show! We’re open today – Wednesday – from 10am – 6pm. (If you are out of town, browse our flicker set.)

This week’s image is from Ellen Susan and is a gorgeous wet plate image. Ellen has been getting a lot of attention as of late. Besides the multi-page spread in June’s PDN, American Photo’s excellent State of the Art blog has a very long post on her work. Congrats!

ABOUT : Ellen Susan (Savannah, GA) produces one-of-a-kind portraits of U.S. Army soldiers based in Southeast Georgia using the historical wet plate process. The majority of men and women in her “Soldier Portraits” have been deployed to Iraq two or three times since 2003. A graduate of MassArt and RISD, Susan has shown at the Houston Center for Photography; RISD|Works in Providence, RI; New Orleans Photo Alliance Gallery in New Orleans, LA; and has an upcoming solo show at Blue Sky Gallery in Portland, OR this summer.

From Susan’s statement:

“Soldier Portraits” – The wet collodion process was the primary photographic method from the 1840s through the 1880s, encompassing the dates of the American Civil War. The men and women photographed for the Soldier Portraits project are members of the U.S. Army based in Southeast Georgia. Most have deployed to Iraq one to three times since 2003. Many are in Iraq now. Army deployments now last 15 months.

The necessarily long exposures of this slow process often result in an intensity of gaze, and the grainless, highly detailed surface brings out minute details of each individual. These attributes, combined with the historical military associations made me feel that the process could be a meaningful way to photograph contemporary soldiers and to provide a counterpoint to the anonymous representations seen in newspapers and on television. I wanted to produce physically enduring, visually arresting images of people who are being sent repeatedly into a war zone.

ABOVE IMAGE: Ellen Susan, SPC Shaun Kramer, 2007, from the series “Soldier Portraits,” Aluminotype, 10 x 8 inches, courtesy of the artist

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In this feature, we showcase an image per week from our current exhibition, EXPOSURE: 13th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition, juried by Aperture’s Lesley A. Martin. In celebration of the last weeks of the show, we increased the frequency (and the excitement). This is the 2nd to last image!

You have 2 days to see the show – the last day is July 2nd! We’re open this week Tuesday and Wednesday 10am – 6pm. (If you are out of town, browse our flicker set.)

This week’s image is from Erik Shubert. Erik’s work, like the other Eric, is about work – and funny! Luckily, I haven’t had too many desk jobs, or these would hit even closer to home. I was thrilled that these two could meet at the opening reception.

ABOUT : Erik Schubert (Cambridge, MA), inspired in part by Dale Carnegie’s book How to Win Friends and Influence People and his businessman father, has been collecting and documenting scenes and ephemera of corporate aspirations and failure. A 2007 MFA graduate of MassArt, Schubert has shown in several juried student shows in Boston such as Boston Young Contemporaries and the 2007 PRC Student Exhibition. He has an upcoming solo show, Thinking Big, at the Slocumb Gallery at East Tennessee State University in Johnson City, TN.

From Erik’s statement:

“How to Win Friends and Influence People” – Realizing that we live in an increasingly business-centered society, how we navigate as “businesspeople” may determine the success or failure of our aspirations and the ability to pursue them. I am interested in how this kind of society shapes our visual world and language.

At a young age it was instilled in me that the mythology from Dale Carnegie’s classic book, How to Win Friends and Influence People was one that predicated success and happiness in life. The book has been widely published and accepted by businesspeople and corporate planners all over the world, including my father.

Some images are documentations of found items, constructed on location. Other images are documentations of ephemera that I have collected from such places as expositions, infomercials, my family, and home. With these photographs, I try to explore and communicate metaphorically the success, failure, and complexity of corporate mythologies in society.

ABOVE IMAGE: Erik Schubert, Level II, 2007/2008, from the series “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” Archival Inkjet Print, 19 x 23 inches, courtesy of the artist

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In this feature, we showcase an image per week from our current exhibition, EXPOSURE: 13th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition, juried by Aperture’s Lesley A. Martin. In celebration of the last few weeks of the show, we are going to increase the frequency (and the excitement) and share 2 per week – it’s a veritable photo frenzy!

Don’t miss it. The show’s last day is July 2nd! (If you are out of town, browse our flicker set.)

This week’s image is from Eric Percher. Eric’s work is colorful and graphically stunning – and funny! Luckily, I haven’t had too many desk jobs, or these would hit even closer to home. Eric recently participated in Review Santa Fe. You can see some of his work here.

ABOUT : Eric Percher (Brooklyn, NY) considers the limitations we accept in order to obtain success. His series “Work” is in part a semi-autobiographical response to his seven-year experience in the financial offices and cubicles of Midtown Manhattan. A fine art photographer living in New York City, he recently received a CENTER (Santa Fe) Singular Image Color Award, Honorable Mention.

From Percher’s statement:

Work considers the limitations we accept in order to obtain success: the constraints erected by the desires and fears that drive our initial ambitions; the stricture of further aspirations that becomes necessary to maintain the success we achieve; and the restrictions inherent to a life in an office-cube, within a numbered building, on a gridded city.

The series reveals moments of limitation, as demonstrated by subjects who are themselves the hard labor and emerging leaders of New York’s most profitable enterprises. The project does not intend to repudiate individual pursuits of success but to illuminate the tensions and sacrifices required to achieve such success. Consequently, the viewer is asked to consider the same question as the subject: is there sustenance in your hard work and satisfaction in its completion, or is this simply an economic transaction, dollars in exchange for hours, security swapped for autonomy? Or as the subjects might put it, does the return justify the investment?

ABOVE IMAGE: Eric Percher, Untitled, 2006/2008, from the series “Work,” Digital C-Print, 30 x 40 inches, courtesy of the artist

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In this feature, we showcase an image per week from our current exhibition, EXPOSURE: 13th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition, juried by Aperture’s Lesley A. Martin. In celebration of the last few weeks of the show, we are going to increase the frequency (and the excitement) and share 2 per week – it’s a veritable photo frenzy!

Don’t miss it. The show’s last day is July 2nd! (If you are out of town, browse our flicker set.)

This week’s image is from Ben Lowy. Ben’s work has been generating a lot of buzz here. The suite of 4 images are an interesting and different look at the war in Iraq.

ABOUT : Benjamin Lowy (New York, NY) captures everyday scenes in Iraq as seen through the lens of his camera and the inches-thick, bulletproof window of an American Army Humvee. A self-represented assignment photographer with stock syndicated through the VII Network and clients ranging from The New York Times Magazine to Newsweek, Lowy was named one of PDN’s 30 emerging photographers to watch in 2004 and participated in the World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass. Granted the Eddie Adams/Carl Mydans Award for War Photography, Lowy’s work has received awards from American Photography, Communication Arts, World Press Photo, and Pictures of the Year International, among others.

From Lowy’s statement:

I began this project as a response to what I felt was the general inability of people back home to comprehend what Iraq is like. Most people have never really seen or felt the effects of war. Confronted by a level of violence so high that walking on the streets to photograph is tantamount to suicidal behavior, I found myself confined to working with American soldiers, spending most of my time going on various missions while looking at the landscape of this broken country. My only view was through the inches-thick bulletproof window of an Army Humvee.

Metaphorically speaking, these windows represent a barrier that impedes dialogue. These pictures show a fragment of Iraqi life taken by a transient passenger in a Humvee. The images are not intimate – they often show a distant and detached perspective of a country so empty, so desolate and of a situation so dire.

ABOVE IMAGE:

Benjamin Lowy, A U.S. Army tank patrols in front of an often bombed Iraqi police station in Abu Ghraib as seen from a passing army Humvee patrol on July 11, 2007, 2007, from the series “Iraq: Perspectives,” Archival Inkjet Print, 11 ¾ x 16 ½ inches, courtesy of the artist and VII Network

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In this new feature, we are showcasing an image per week from our current exhibition, the 13th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition. This is our 7th to date.

Last Friday concluded a 2 week run of the PRC on Flak Photo. This “web photo happening” spotlighted 10 images from the Juried Show. We’re still a “feature” on their home page, www.flakphoto.com, and in the gallery, so check it out. Thanks Andy!

If you are out of town, don’t worry, we posted lots of images of the installation and reception on our PRC Flickr page!

From Martine’s statement:
“Tête-à-Tête is a series of intimate portraits of my two adolescent sons and their friends, taken in our home in New York City as well as in the South of France. …Begun in the fall of 2005, the work explores adolescence as a liminal state-a time between childhood and adulthood, the feminine and the masculine, and innocence and a burgeoning self-consciousness.”

ABOVE IMAGE: Martine Fougeron, Nicolas and Adrien Dining, October 2005, from the series “Tête-à-Tête,” Digital C-Print, 15 ½ x 19 ½ inches, courtesy of the artist

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In this new feature, we are showcasing an image per week from our upcoming 13th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition. This is our 6th to date, slightly delayed due to the holiday on Monday.

I first saw Talia Chetrit’s work in the juried graduate exhibition, Boston Young Contemporaries. I always love when artists address their own mediums. BYC 2008 will be coming soon to the 808 Gallery, right next door to the PRC, July 18th through August 2nd!

Talia’s work is different, it’s hard to put a finger on it. Enthralled, I showed her in our online series of emerging photographers, Northeast Exposure Online (or NEO for short). I was thrilled that our juror Lesley A. Martin liked her work too and selected it for this year’s show.

Here is a snippet from her artist statement:
“Photography records optical space.
Light and time are its basic elements. I reduce my subject to these fundamental components to investigate the potential of photography’s inherent properties and how we perceive and categorize this medium. I examine the photographic process and experiment with perception-both the viewer’s and my own. How can the basic tools of light and space move us? How can we encounter them differently?…
From white to black, Grayscale refers to the Zone System, a chart traditionally used when exposing negatives for a perfect tonal spectrum.”

And don’t forget – since this past Monday, the PRC has been teaming up with the kind folks at Flak Photo to feature 10 images from the Juried Show, a “web photo happening” if you will. The series continue today, and runs weekdays through the end of this week, May 26 – 30.

If you are out of town, don’t worry, we posted some images of the installation and reception (with more to come this week) on our PRC Flickr page!

ABOVE IMAGE: Talia Chetrit, Rainbow, 2007, Inkjet Print, 24 x 20 inches, courtesy of the artist

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The show is hung, the labels are up, and the carpet is vacuumed!
If you are in the Boston area, stop by for some art, hummus, and good conversation TONIGHT from 5:30-7:30pm. The show looks great!

In addition the wonderful mention of the PRC in PDN this month and the current “web photo happening” this week and next week on flakphoto.com, we’ve been lucky to get a lot of attention about this year’s show, EXPOSURE: The 13th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition.

Online today is a super AV slideshow feature on BU Today. Our favorite BU reporter Kimberly Cornuelle spoke to 3 of the artists in the show – Lana Z Caplan, Claire Beckett, and Cree Bruins – and the slideshow features every image in the exhibition!

Here is some other press for you to check out – but do come by and see the work in person if you can!

* Boston Phoenix last week
* Boston Phoenix,
this week, May 22, 8 days a week/ critic’s pick
* Boston Globe, Sidekick, Friday, May 23

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