Archive for the “Benefit Auction” Category

By Jessica Ladd, PRC Fall 2012 Intern

The ambiance that accompanies this black and white photograph by Vivien Goldman is one of tranquility and peace. The viewer is drawn to the center, the focal point of the image, a window framed by a simple lace curtain. It’s sheer, semi-translucent lace is almost ghost-like, illuminating a soft patch of light that shines through the bottom section of the rectangular window. This light casts shadows that reflect onto the surrounding walls, creating different levels of white and gray. The curtain itself has a delicate crosshatched pattern that can be observed in the upper portion of the window. Its swag is draped gently over the top windowpane, creating a delicate curve that adds a level of elegance to the already beautiful curtain.

Vivien Goldman, Lacy Curtain, 2011, Archival Inkjet Print, 16×20 inches, courtesy of the artist

The paint that once coated the walls and ceiling surrounding the window is now severely chipped and peeling. Cracks in the paint create giant Xs that travel from one section of the wall to another like veins. In the upper left corner, almost all of the paint is gone, exposing the concrete wall that it once covered. This bare wall almost serves as an omen to the walls that are still mostly coated in flaking paint. With time, they too will be bare.

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By Jessica Ladd, PRC Fall 2012 Intern

What do we think of when we hear the word “auction”? Is it the booming voice of the auctioneer over the microphone? Or maybe it’s the bidders battling over who has the highest bid? What about all the interesting items being bid upon? Since the day I began my internship at the PRC in September, all I heard people talking about was the auction. In the months before, there was so much to do.  Artists would come to the PRC, dropping off large, square packages that I knew were filled with brilliant works of art. When I unwrapped each package, I felt like I was holding a fortune in my hands. They were all so different, so unique. When the night of the auction finally came, I was excited, but also a little nervous because I had no idea what to expect. All I knew was that I was going to be an art handler, which meant I was going to hold pieces up for the bidders to see during the live auction.

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By Zach Hoffman, PRC Fall 2012 Intern

The first thing I noticed about this piece was the hand of the artist. Personal choices of content and composition mark this print as a unique view of photographer Carol Golemboski. From her series Psychometry, “They Hook and They Hold” explores themes of loss, anxiety, and doubt through the “hand-made” photographic process.

Carol Golemboski, “They Hook and They Hold,” 2001, Toned Silver Gelatin Print,
Signed Verso, AP, 10 x 10 inches, courtesy of the artist.

The evolution of photography has come a long way. Starting in the early 90s, Photoshop has made the direct manipulation of any image possible, allowing photographers full freedom to create.  At the time only professional photographers were able to access this amazing tool, but today it is in the hands and pockets of anyone with a smart phone. There is an endless amount of apps to change any image into a “retro” work of art.

Rejecting the “photoshopped” image, some photographers have begun to return to historical processes and dark room manipulations for creative expression. Although you can reproduce the same manipulations on the computer, photographers like Carol Golemboski rely on the process to produce one-of-a-kind results only found in the dark room.

“They Hook and They Hold” is an elegant and abstract exploration of the tension and fascination of the unknown inherent in all of us. A dark and consuming void fills the image, broken only by sharp contrast of the birdbath and hooks. The objects are not meant to be specific but are intended to invite the viewer to interpret their own meaning. To me the hooks represent the unseen trap set by those with power. There is always a tension or fear of being caught in the snares of daily life.

As a photographer and lover of the hand-made I find so much beauty in work like this. I am always fascinated when an artist uses scratching in the image. They are almost signatures of the artist and reference a sense of history and constant use. They also add to an illusion of depth and materiality in the image.

I could go on and on about this image and what each aspect means to me, but like Golemboski, I want to invite you to interpret the image in your own way. Photographs like these are not only to be looked at but to be a place of personal reflection and understanding.

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By Meredith Hoobler, PRC Fall 2012 Intern

As the title hints, this image depicts a vast mountain scene in the background with a valley in the middle ground. The foreground portrays a set of humans hands holding a glass orb filled almost to the top with water. The camera lens shoots through the water, capturing the distorted and turned upside-down reflection of the scene. A llama sits just left of the human hands, the tip of its nose appearing to touch the upper portion of the woman’s fingers. This perplexing image is not extremely colorful—the colors are muted and mostly earth tones. There is a small patch of blue in the upper right portion on the print, the sky visible to the side of the mountains.  Then the burnt yellow of the autumn grass spreads across the bottom of the photograph along the valley, making the print appear slightly glowing. This glowing is interrupted by the fleshy color of the hands in the central portion of the work. The burnt brown of the hilltops sharply rises to meet the black and white mountains. The only other area of color is within the reflection in the water.

Ivana George, “Glacial Waters 4,” 2011, Giclee on Moab Cotton Paper, 1/25, Signed Recto, 14×21 inches, $1,000.
ivanadamiengeorge.com

The areas of the photograph are very divided into distinctive “grounds,” back, middle, and fore. This concept immediately reminds this viewer of specific divisions and even steps towards Futurism. The Futurist movement originated in Italy and focused on the technology, violence, and speed all associated with the future. Famous futurist artists questioned everything about the past and decided to start looking at their new and fresh subjects with different perspectives than previous artists. This idea of new perspectives is seen through the glass orb. Also, movement was a key aspect of the Futurist philosophy—capturing it, representing it, and mimicking it.  Even though the image is stagnant, the water and the image appear to move slightly. The water in the orb, in combination with the light, provides the illusion the image is vibrating, moving with the current of the water.

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Check out the full page write-up about the 2009 PRC Benefit Auction
in the Oct 21-Nov 3rd issue of Improper Bostonian!

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The time is here… Get your tickets and bids in now and come out and support the PRC in its largest and most important fundraiser of the year.

This is an elegant and fun event – the food by East meets West is excellent and plentiful, it includes all refreshments, dessert, coffee, and even parking (just rsvp before). And of course you also get fantastic company, a beautiful art deco space, and the opportunity to walk home with an amazing photograph (and did we mention all of them come framed?). Ticket info is below.

Preview the catalogue by clicking above or here and see pics from last year’s gala event here. For those not in town, absentee bids can be taken on any item, live or silent. The PRC staff will have their pencils ready! See you Saturday.

TICKETS: $50 per individual ticket, $40 per non-member.

This includes one copy of the auction catalogue, one paddle, buffet from East Meets West, beverages, and parking with advance reservations. Contact Caleb Cole at 617.975.0600 for tickets, reservations, and bids. Mastercard, Visa, checks, cash accepted.

AUCTION: Saturday, October 24, 2009
808 Gallery at 808 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Reception and silent auction begins at 5:30pm; Live auction begins at 7:00pm. The silent will close in increments after the close of the live auction.

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This fall, close to 150 vintage and contemporary photographs go up for auction to benefit the PRC and its programming. Above is one of the amazing images on which you can bid.

In this new feature on the PRC blog, we will be featuring two generous donations from the 2009 PRC Benefit Auction-on Mondays and Thursdays-each week through the summer and fall. Tickets will be available in August and a catalogue will be posted online in September.

Click here or on the above image for more information and keep checking back!

Michael Kenna, Blackpool Pier, Lancashire, England 1983, 1983, Gelatin Silver Print, 8 15/16 x 6 3/16 inches, Signed recto, Courtesy of Anonymous Donor

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This fall, close to 150 vintage and contemporary photographs go up for auction to benefit the PRC and its programming. Above is one of the amazing images on which you can bid.

In this new feature on the PRC blog, we will be featuring two generous donations from the 2009 PRC Benefit Auction-on Mondays and Thursdays-each week through the summer and fall. Tickets will be available in August and a catalogue will be posted online in September.

Click here or on the above image for more information and keep checking back!

William Wegman, Lean To, 2002, C-Print, 7 1/4 x 7 1/4 inches, Edition 1/12, Signed verso, Courtesy of Artist.

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This fall, close to 150 vintage and contemporary photographs go up for auction to benefit the PRC and its programming. Above is one of the amazing images on which you can bid.

In this new feature on the PRC blog, we will be featuring two generous donations from the 2009 PRC Benefit Auction-on Mondays and Thursdays-each week through the summer and fall. Tickets will be available in August and a catalogue will be posted online in September.

Click here or on the above image for more information and keep checking back!

Stephen Petegorsky, Untitled #1, 1991/2009, Archival Inkjet Print, 14 1/2 x 18 inches, Edition 3/25, Signed recto, Courtesy of Artist.

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This fall, close to 150 vintage and contemporary photographs go up for auction to benefit the PRC and its programming. Above is one of the amazing images on which you can bid.

In this new feature on the PRC blog, we will be featuring two generous donations from the 2009 PRC Benefit Auction-on Mondays and Thursdays-each week through the summer and fall. Tickets will be available in August and a catalogue will be posted online in September.

Click here or on the above image for more information and keep checking back!

Gordon Parks, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Joe Waite, Hostler’s Helper, and Alez Nipper, Boss Wiper, in the Canadian Pacific Round House, 1945 Gelatin Silver Print, 9 3/16 x 9 3/8 inches, Not editioned, Not signed, Courtesy of Lee Gallery

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