Posts Tagged “exposure”

Even though the juried show is now no longer on the gallery walls, we are featuring images from EXPOSURE: The 14th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition. This is the last image/artist featured before we start up our auction feature next week!  Enjoy the below statement and check out the links.

Surf on in to our flickr site and check out installation shots and photos from the opening reception of EXPOSURE by clicking here.

KEVIN VAN AELST

My color photographs consist of common artifacts and scenes from everyday life, which have been rearranged, assembled, or constructed into various forms, patterns, and illustrations. The images aim to examine the distance between the “big picture” and the “little things” in life-the banalities of our daily lives, and the sublime notions of identity and existence. While the depictions of information-such as an EKG, fingerprint, map or anatomical model-are unconventional, the truth and accuracy to the illustrations are just as valid as their traditional depictions. This work is about creating order where we expect to find randomness. I also hope that it suggests that the minutia all around us is capable of communicating much larger ideas.

Kevin Van Aelst, Right Middle Finger, 2007/2009, Digital C-print, 40 x 30 inches, courtesy of the artist

Click here to visit the artist’s website

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Even though the juried show is now no longer on the gallery walls, we are featuring images from EXPOSURE: The 14th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition. Check back this Thursday to see the last image, including artist statements and website links.

Surf on in to our flickr site and check out installation shots and photos from the opening reception of EXPOSURE by clicking here.

LOUISA MARIE SUMMER-“Youth in the Republic of Georgia” 2007

Youth in the Republic of Georgia -or the fantasy of ‘normality'”

The Republic of Georgia lies at the Black Sea and is located at the dividing line between Europe and Asia. Georgia has been a representative democracy since 1991 but faces severe problems with its neighbor Russia and its separatist regions Abkhazia and South Ossetia.

These four images were shot in April and May 2007 and are part of a hardcover book of 125 photographs entitled /Megobrebi! Searching for the Future/. This work documents the diverse lifestyle of contemporary Georgian youth. Today’s young people are torn between religious and traditional values – including honesty, pride, family, and hospitality – and their dreams of a Western way of life with its attendant status symbols such as cars, fashion, and glamour.

With my pictures, I want to communicate people’s everyday life, including their experiences and emotions, so that the observer gets an impression, a feeling about what it means to be a young person living in the Republic of Georgia today.

Louisa Marie Summer, Smoking Youngster, 2007, from the series “Youth in the Republic of Georgia,” Archival inkjet print, 16 x 24 inches, courtesy of the artist

Click here to visit the artist’s website

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Even though the juried show is now no longer on the gallery walls, we’ll continue to feature two images per week from EXPOSURE: The 14th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition until next Thursday. Check back Monday and Thursday to see the last images and artists, including artist statements and website links.

Surf on in to our flickr site and check out installation shots and photos from the opening reception of EXPOSURE by clicking here.

BETSY SCHNEIDER-“Scenes” 2000-2009

With the hope of subtly subverting expectations of what childhood should look like, I strive to make images which are at once familiar and strange, provocative and reassuring, candid and performative. I believe that childhood is defined less by an idealized state of innocence and more by a drive for knowledge and experience. The series consists of intuitive and spontaneous pictures taken when I am with my children and their friends in our everyday lives: in backyards, pools, parks, motels, zoos, etc..  The work grows out of my observations of my children’s’ experience of the world. Ultimately, the work, like parenthood itself, has proven to be far less of a means to express my previously established ideas about children and being a parent, but has taken on much more of its own journey, teaching and revealing as much as reflecting. This continues to be a work in progress.

Betsy Schneider, The Tub, 2003, from the series “Scenes,” Archival inkjet print, 16 x 20 inches, courtesy of the artist

Click here to visit the artist’s website

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Even though the juried show is now no longer on the gallery walls (it is closed as of June 29th), we’ll continue to feature two images per week from EXPOSURE: The 14th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition until next Thursday.  Keep checking back to see an image per artist as well as artist statements and website links.

Surf on in to our flickr site and check out installation shots and photos from the opening reception of EXPOSURE by clicking here

LYDIA PANAS-“Family Pictures/Untold Stories” 2007-2008

These are family pictures.  Not the ones you find in a family album, but the ones we put aside.

The photographs are not always comfortable. They ask that we look deeper than the surface. They record the distances that separate individuals. They hold ambiguities and conflicts as well as expose secrets.

I invite families to pose for me. I feel deep affection for those who stand in front of my camera and tread gently with their feelings.  I wait until the face they present to the public is gone and try to photograph what lies underneath: the complex part we often don’t see about ourselves.  Though at times, I am unsure if I should continue, it is the job of the artist to expose and reveal.

My own feelings are uncovered in the process. (We can only see that which we recognize.)  I photograph so I can understand.

Lydia Panas, Tony and Maddie, 2007/ 2008, from the series “Family Pictures / Untold Stories,” C-print, 32 x 40 inches, courtesy of the artist

Click here to visit the artist’s website

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In this new feature, we’ll be featuring two images per week from EXPOSURE: The 14th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition. Keep checking back on Mondays and Thursdays to see an image per artist as well as artist statements and website links.

This is the last weekend of the physical show, but we’ll continue to feature images from Exposure until mid July.  So, if you are in the Boston area, stop by before June 28th!  The PRC is open this Thursday, 10 – 8pm, Friday 10- 6pm, and Saturday and Sunday, 12-5pm. Click here for directions.

Surf on in to our flickr site and check out installation shots and photos from the opening reception of EXPOSURE by clicking here

BRAD MOORE

These photographs were shot in modest, well-worn, suburban cities in central and inland Southern California. Built in the 1950s and 60s, these cities provided a new home and future to a post-war population. This is where I grew up and, after 25 years, I returned. The areas I remembered were fading away, and I was struck by the simultaneous growth and decline. Initially, it was the buildings that interested me; I shot them in formal, almost symmetrical compositions. Then I began shooting the surrounding shrubbery with the same architectural approach. I liked the way the buildings and plants worked together, so that is how the project evolved. I have opted to avoid traditional, documentary-style photography; instead I have photographed in primarily static compositions, reflecting change, irony and evolution.

Brad Moore, Kermore Lane, Stanton, California, 2008, Archival pigment print, 16 x 21 3/4 inches, courtesy of the artist

Click here to visit the artist’s website

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In this new feature, we’ll be featuring two images per week from EXPOSURE: The 14th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition. Keep checking back on Mondays and Thursdays to see an image per artist as well as artist statements and website links.

Surf on in to our flickr site and check out installation shots and photos from the opening reception of EXPOSURE by clicking here.

SARAH A. MARTIN-“You are What You Love” 2007-2008

Growing up, I was told the acronym, J.O.Y, was the key to establishing a fulfilled life. J.O.Y. is a reminder that life is balanced when your priorities are: Jesus, others…and then, you. So, what happens when your religious upbringing doesn’t make sense and all of a sudden you are O.Y.J. or just O.Y.? That doesn’t spell anything, does it?

I am looking to my childhood friends, old Sunday-School rooms, and the new generations of J.O.Y. seekers to make sure I’m not missing the point. Some of my old friends are also struggling to balance priorities, secret desires, and misplaced maternal instincts (pets) ultimately hoping more than anything to find a place to put their love.

Sarah A. Martin, Untitled, 2007/2008, from the series “You are What You Love,” Archival inkjet print, 12 x 18 inches, courtesy of the artist

Click here to visit the artist’s website

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In this new feature, we’ll be featuring two images per week from EXPOSURE: The 14th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition. Keep checking back on Mondays and Thursdays to see an image per artist as well as artist statements and website links.

Surf on in to our flickr site and check out installation shots and photos from the opening reception of EXPOSURE by clicking here.

CAROLYN V. MARSDEN

To create these woven photographs, I photograph either a location at two different times of day from the same vantage point or a set of two family members from a similar point of view. I cut the photographs into strips, and then weave them back together. The landscapes are static objects, but they demonstrate the divergent appearances created in a single place by the light of different times of day. The portraits are a representation of family resemblance and genetic similarity. The weaving technique shows the siblings’ resemblance and individuality at once.

Carolyn V. Marsden, Brother and Sister, 2008, Woven photograph using inkjet prints, 30 x 30 inches, courtesy of the artist

Click here to visit the artist’s website

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In this new feature, we’ll be featuring two images per week from EXPOSURE: The 14th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition. Keep checking back on Mondays and Thursdays to see an image per artist as well as artist statements and website links.

Surf on in to our flickr site and check out installation shots and photos from the opening reception of EXPOSURE by clicking here.

BETH LILLY-“Monster” 2005-2009

The recent explosive growth seen by many Southern cities began a turf war where both trees and power lines fight for the same thin stretch of green space. The idea of an actual war waging unnoticed on city streets caught my imagination. Hidden in plain view were literally the front lines in what could be called the “Nature versus Civilization” conflict.

Starting in 2004, I photographed in Atlanta, Nashville, and Charlotte to tell this story hopefully from the trees’ point of view. The photograph becomes the portal though which the fauna demand to be taken into account and prompt viewers to ask questions about the relationship between nature and culture, the difference between humans and non-humans, and the evolution of the city’s civic landscape. Just who are the monsters? Is it the trees that have been forced into unnatural shapes or the systems that place trees at the bottom of the power hierarchy?

Beth Lilly, Highland View, Atlanta , 2007, Archival pigment print, 22 x 17 inches, courtesy of the artist

Click here to visit the artist’s website

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In this new feature, we’ll be featuring two images per week from EXPOSURE: The 14th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition. Keep checking back on Mondays and Thursdays to see an image per artist as well as artist statements and website links.

Surf on in to our flickr site and check out installation shots and photos from the opening reception of EXPOSURE by clicking here.

PHIL JUNG-“Windscreen” 2008

A car’s interior is both a public and private space. The interior, littered with personal articles, offers a portrait of its owner, while the aging exterior conveys imminent decay.

The gasoline-powered vehicles that were introduced in 1896 represented freedom, hope, exploration, and independence–quintessentially American ideals. By 1947, when the photographer Wright Morris made his image of an aging Model T, those early ideals had already begun to deteriorate. Windscreen revisits those concepts by exploring the relationship between automobiles and their owners today.

When combing through neighborhoods for cars, I look first for the way light enters a car and renders color. If I find nothing inside its cabin that tells something about its owner, I move on. Above all, the car needs to be drivable or just recently taken off the road. If a car sits for too long uninhabited, it loses something. The composite of this automotive space reflects who we are, where we come from, and possibly where we are going.

Phil Jung, Verbenas on the Desert, 2008, Archival pigment print, 32 x 40 inches, courtesy of the artist

Click here to visit the artist’s website

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In this new feature, we’ll be featuring two images per week from EXPOSURE: The 14th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition. Keep checking back on Mondays and Thursdays to see an image per artist as well as artist statements and website links.

Surf on in to our flickr site and check out installation shots and photos from the opening reception of EXPOSURE by clicking here.

JOE HOLMES

To create the images for the LCD series, I photographed visitors at New York’s American Museum of Natural History over a period of four months in 2008 and 2009. I based all choices about focus, white balance, color, contrast, etc. solely on the LCD screen that is captured in each image; the rest of the image was allowed to fall where it may. Other than those adjustments, the images are unaltered.

Joseph O. Holmes, lcd 2800, 2009, Pigment inkjet print, 15 x 22 inches, courtesy of the artist

Click here to visit the artist’s website

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