Posts Tagged “intern”

As a young girl, I spent my weekends in my grandfather’s darkroom.  Both a professor of photography and amateur photographer, my grandfather instilled in me the basic knowledge of camera and darkroom processes.  In high school, I competed in a number of state and regional art competitions.  The positive responses I received for my photographs, and the loving support from my family encouraged me to pursue a degree in photography.

In 2012, I received my Bachelor of Fine Arts in photography and art history from Massachusetts College of Art and Design.  My most successful body of work, Noise, explores the urban landscape in response to societies surreal alienation and my search for connection within it.  These images speak at once to the present and the past.  Taken with a small format camera and high-speed film, the enlarged grain enhances the contemporary experience, as I perceive it, distorted and indifferent.

In the summer of 2011, I completed a curatorial internship at the Danforth Museum of Art.  While at the Danforth, I worked primarily on the preparation of the New England Photography Biennial.  That same year, I curated my first student photography exhibition at Massachusetts College of Art and Design.  From these experiences I realized my passion lay in arts administration and exhibition studies with a concentration in photography.  I hope my internship at the PRC will provide me with knowledge of each career path and keep me actively involved in the photographic community.

You can view more of my work on my website: www.mariahazoti.com

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 By Jessica Ladd, PRC Fall 2012 Intern

Since opening in 1971, the Panopticon Gallery has become one of the oldest fine art photography galleries in the United States specializing in contemporary, modern, and vintage photography.  Their goal is to represent established and emerging photographers who are focused on developing and expanding their careers. They also regularly assist collectors in buying, selling, and locating photographs along with supporting local educational institutions. On October 25th, I had the privilege of attending the Panopticon Gallery’s Fall Photography Salon, where photographers represented by gallery owner Jason Landry were able to show off their most recent work. The artists-Lindsey Beal, Heidi Kirkpatrick, Stella Johnson, Roger Farrington, Alexander Harding, and Bill Franson-all had very different ideas, making each of their portfolios unique.  Throughout the night, I was able to talk with and interview each photographer and learn more about his or her artistic style.  My goal was to learn what each of their portfolios was about, if there was a message they were trying to convey, and what inspired them to create their personal style of photography.

Interestingly enough, both Heidi Kirkpatrick and Lindsey Beal have incorporated themes involving contemporary and historical women’s issues, feminism, and sexuality into their work. Their images highlight the delicate shapes and gentle curves of the female body through unique photographic methods such as transparent imagery on film, sculpture, and 3D mixed media objects. But while the overarching themes of Beal and Kirkpatrick’s work are similar, vast differences set them apart from one another. Kirkpatrick’s work depicts the world experienced by women, along with exploring various areas of the female body in detail, such as faces, arms, legs, breasts, hands, and hair. The subjects in her images range from infants to full grown women, symbolizing the different stages of female’s life.  In a non-traditional approach to photography, Kirkpatrick has transferred these vintage images onto three-dimensional objects including wooden blocks, ceramic spheres, and even mahjong tiles. When I inquired as to why she had chosen such a unique way to display her work, she said that she wanted to give both the objects and photographs a second life. “Only part of their story is being told,” she stated, “The rest is out of reach.” This idea caused me to view the items in a new light, and not as old things, but symbols of another era. What purpose did these objects serve before they were altered? Who are the women in these photographs? What stories do they have to tell? The answers to these questions are, unfortunately, lost with time, but through her creative process, Kirkpatrick has indeed given them a ‘new life.’

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By Jessica Ladd, PRC Fall 2012 Intern

What do we think of when we hear the word “auction”? Is it the booming voice of the auctioneer over the microphone? Or maybe it’s the bidders battling over who has the highest bid? What about all the interesting items being bid upon? Since the day I began my internship at the PRC in September, all I heard people talking about was the auction. In the months before, there was so much to do.  Artists would come to the PRC, dropping off large, square packages that I knew were filled with brilliant works of art. When I unwrapped each package, I felt like I was holding a fortune in my hands. They were all so different, so unique. When the night of the auction finally came, I was excited, but also a little nervous because I had no idea what to expect. All I knew was that I was going to be an art handler, which meant I was going to hold pieces up for the bidders to see during the live auction.

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Rania Matar
Girls in Between: Portraits of Identity
PRC Gallery, 832 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

Nancy Grace Horton: Being 13
PRC Members’ Gallery, 832 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston

September 6- November 3, 2012

Review by Jessica Ladd, PRC Intern, Fall 2012

Adolescence is often one of the most difficult and frustrating periods that we encounter in our lives. After living carefree for most of our lives, we are suddenly thrust into a roller coaster of a world where we have to make difficult choices. It is also a time when we begin to discover who we are and the type of person we want to become. In their recent work, Rania Matar and Nancy Grace Horton have documented this metamorphic period through photography. They focus on young women who are bridging the gap between childhood and adulthood. Each of the girls featured in the photographs of this exhibit have some kind of story to tell, and it is through their portraits that we are able to visually connect with them.

Rania Matar
Shannon, Boston 2010
From the Series, A Girl and her Room

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Paul Ickovic. Kafka’s Grave & Other Stories: Photographs. New York: Okapi Editions, 1986. Print.

BOOK REVIEW by Stephanie Robb, PRC Intern, Fall 2011

“Go down to the library, select a book, any book,” Julie gestures a wide arc, “and write a review for our blog.” She is smiling when she says this. “Great, okay!” I reply, enthusiastic about the opportunity. Moments later, I stand in the middle of the library wondering how on earth I can choose just one book. If you’ve been to the PRC library, you’ll understand my dilemma. The collection is widely varied and every single book is full of pictures—and I love picture books. Having said that, I am also a devoted lover of stories and I have developed a passion for words.

I decide to begin my search with titles. If the words on the spine of the book catch my attention, I carefully pull it from the shelf and decide if the contents capture my imagination in the way a good storyteller can. After glancing through several books and tearing myself away from several more, a familiar name catches my eye. Ever since Renée Zellweger said his name while pushing a vacuum wearing Granny underwear in Bridget Jones’ Diary, and much more frequently in the last year, the name Kafka has nagged at me. It is a familiar name, one I ought to know, whose work I have somehow managed not to have read yet. In the last few months, I have heard his name mentioned more and more regularly. I’ve always been a person prone to find meaning in numbers and repetitions. “What does all this have to do with photography?” You might be asking.

One particular book, tucked on a shelf that is difficult to access, reads Kafka’s Grave and Other Stories / Ickovic, printed in black on a cloth spine. I think it is out of place and, therefore, most enticing. I press my finger on the top corner, tip the book so I can pull it out. It’s much wider than I expected. At this point in my library assignment, I am speaking aloud to myself, “Oh, it’s wider than I expected!” I thumb through and read the forward by David Mamet, which lures me in further. His words are concise and they speak to my life experience in our increasingly globalized society. He writes:

“…I have always felt like an outsider; and I am sure that the suspicion that I perceive is the suspicion that I provoke by my great longing to belong. I would like to live a life free of constant self-examination—a life which may be ruled by the processes of guilt, remorse, hope, and anxiety, but one in which those processes themselves are not foremost in the mind. I would like to belong to a world dedicated to creating, preserving, achieving, or simply getting by. But the world of the outsider, in which I have chosen to live, and in which I have trained myself to live, is based on none of those things. It is based on observation….”

I have decided. This is the one. So begins my adventure into the photography of Paul Ickovic.

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Kassia Karr

Editor’s Note: This is the first of what hopes to be many posts by our intern/workstudy students! The first is by Kassia Karr, a 4th year BA/MA student in interdisciplinary studies, focusing on South Asia, at BU. As you can see by the above image and at her Web site, she is also a very talented photographer! She’s been away from the PRC for about a year. We’re glad to have her back!

When I landed at Logan Airport in May, it was windy, rainy, and cold: 55, maybe 56 degrees. I had been in transit for over 36 hours, and when I realized that the only ‘warm’ piece of clothing I possessed was a single, well-worn cardigan, I was ready to hop the next plane back to India.

After returning to New England weather, what could possibly cheer me up? Coming back to work at the PRC, of course! I jumped right back into my position as a PRC intern after a year’s absence from Boston. I had left the day after last year’s “Exposure” exhibition, and returned a little over a week before this year’s show. The center was a busy place, with artwork to be hung, condition reports to be filled out, newsletters to be sent, numerous letters to be folded and stamped, etc. The opening reception had a great turnout despite the threat of rain. If a girl in a bright blue skirt handed you a glass of wine or a beer, that was me. Yes, interns wear many hats, including that of bartender.

While I was gone I kept up with PRC happenings via our very active Flickr site. From 7000 miles away I was able to look at images from the 2007 PRC Benefit Auction, the installations for the AD AGENCY, student, and New England Survey exhibitions, and shots of various photographers from our lecture series. I regularly updated my Flickr account as well, giving people back home a little glimpse of my life and travels during my year abroad. I also enjoyed perusing our contacts’ Flickr sites and user-driven groups like the New England Survey photo pool. I was happy to see my friend and local photographer Derek Vincent contributing some of his work to the pool.

Despite the mediocre weather, I’m happy to be back in Boston and back at the PRC. There’s a busy summer ahead, as it’s time to start organizing the 2008 PRC Benefit Auction set for October 25th. I am looking forward to the work ahead!

ABOVE IMAGE: Hanukkah in Madurai. December 2007. Photo by Kassia Karr

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