Posts Tagged “Meredith Hoobler”

By Meredith Hoobler, PRC Fall 2012 Intern

Walking down the hallway leading to the Ori Gersht: History Repeating exhibition, I hear unidentifiable sounds, looming, heavy sounds that immediately envelop me. Directly ahead is a grey wall that displays one of Gersht’s many prints. I am immediately drawn into the photograph depicting an explosion, Blow Up. The suspenseful work depicts flower petals and fragments of glass being blown in every direction, looking as though they will scratch the print itself. Distracted by this violent and vivid image, I walk up to what appears to be a painting. I hear a shot and whip my head around, immediately disoriented and confused as to why I hear gunshots in the Museum of Fine Arts. What I think is a photograph has just started to move; the screen depicts a previously hanging pomegranate that is now splattering its contents all over the floor, the objects sprawled below like blood dripping from a wound. It swings like a pendulum gushing its juices on everything in its path.

Continuing through the rest of the show, I experience many mixed emotions. It is apparent that the works were arranged for aesthetic impact, but I only focus on their subtle undertones.  I inspect the visual aspects of the work that accompany the written descriptions and feel a complicated combination of emotions: I am inspired, horrified, impressed, and confounded.  On my first visit, expecting to spend only a half hour in the exhibition, I stay an absurd three hours in the two-room gallery viewing the two-dimensional works and three digital productions.

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By Meredith Hoobler, PRC Fall 2012 Intern

Exhibition planning, design, and execution is one of those tasks that simultaneously makes curators want to pull their hair out and jump around like a little girl who just received her first doll. It is complicated yet surprisingly simple, and its success depends on a few very important skills. Over the months I have worked at the Photographic Resource Center, I have been constantly working with Erin Wederbrook Yuskaitis, the Program & Exhibition Manager. Working on so many different projects at the PRC it has been easy for me to pick up the important aspects of exhibition development, through Erin discussing her tasks with me, and my own observations.

Everything fell into place for me personally when I interviewed Erin for a profile article. Sitting down with her at an isolated location away from work really allowed us to converse about her thoughts about the upcoming exhibit, The Space in Between: Daniel Feldman, Stefanie Klavens, and Lynn Saville. This one exhibit taught me in only two short months about approximately a yearlong journey that ends with an opening night.

First and foremost, you need substance. You need to get that spark, light bulb, or flash of an idea, usually triggered by seeing an artist’s work. Once you have the idea, brainstorming steps in. What other artists could pair or complement this one, should it be a solo show, which works are the most influential, powerful, or able to be applied to your theme? This step’s time period is infinite and depends on individual timelines, a boss or department’s deadline, or the organization where the show is to be installed and exhibited. Erin explained the difference in timelines to me based on institution size. Smaller nonprofits such as the PRC have much less time in planning. A year is ideal, but usually the curator and small support staff have under a year to complete the exhibition process. A larger museum typically requires years of planning and research done by a much larger staff of professionals and interns.

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After a summer abroad in Italy studying Venetian Renaissance art, I am extremely eager to return to the PRC for another internship this fall. My experience abroad and photography practice this summer in Rome, Verona, Venice, Padua, Bologna, Florence, Monte Grappa, Milan, Cinque Terre, and Bassano made me excited to continue interning.

Balcony in Venice

After contemplating for a long time about what exactly I wanted to tackle in the fall semester, I couldn’t find an internship that better meets my interests. I wanted a hands-on experience where I was not running to get coffee but participating in daily activities, given important responsibilities, and asked my opinion. Because I interned at the PRC in the spring, the staff invited me back for a new position working almost exclusively with Program & Exhibition Manager Erin Wederbrook Yuskaitis. This year, I will focus on the PRC 2012 Benefit Auction and various upcoming shows.

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By Meredith Hoobler, PRC Fall 2012 Intern

As the title hints, this image depicts a vast mountain scene in the background with a valley in the middle ground. The foreground portrays a set of humans hands holding a glass orb filled almost to the top with water. The camera lens shoots through the water, capturing the distorted and turned upside-down reflection of the scene. A llama sits just left of the human hands, the tip of its nose appearing to touch the upper portion of the woman’s fingers. This perplexing image is not extremely colorful—the colors are muted and mostly earth tones. There is a small patch of blue in the upper right portion on the print, the sky visible to the side of the mountains.  Then the burnt yellow of the autumn grass spreads across the bottom of the photograph along the valley, making the print appear slightly glowing. This glowing is interrupted by the fleshy color of the hands in the central portion of the work. The burnt brown of the hilltops sharply rises to meet the black and white mountains. The only other area of color is within the reflection in the water.

Ivana George, “Glacial Waters 4,” 2011, Giclee on Moab Cotton Paper, 1/25, Signed Recto, 14×21 inches, $1,000.
ivanadamiengeorge.com

The areas of the photograph are very divided into distinctive “grounds,” back, middle, and fore. This concept immediately reminds this viewer of specific divisions and even steps towards Futurism. The Futurist movement originated in Italy and focused on the technology, violence, and speed all associated with the future. Famous futurist artists questioned everything about the past and decided to start looking at their new and fresh subjects with different perspectives than previous artists. This idea of new perspectives is seen through the glass orb. Also, movement was a key aspect of the Futurist philosophy—capturing it, representing it, and mimicking it.  Even though the image is stagnant, the water and the image appear to move slightly. The water in the orb, in combination with the light, provides the illusion the image is vibrating, moving with the current of the water.

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Not an artist but an art enthusiast, Meredith Hoobler is the new PRC intern for the spring 2012 semester. An art history major and business minor at Boston University, she is new to the arts industry and ready to absorb all of the knowledge with which the PRC can provide her. Also a volunteer at the Museum of Fine Arts, she is ready to switch gears to a small, non-profit organization focusing on one main medium.  Interested in arts administration as well as the artistic side of the industry, she is hoping to gain valuable knowledge of running a smaller organization.

The PRC interested her because of the overlapping positions of each of the staff members—everyone contributes and works with each other to get the necessary preparations done for exhibitions, membership, and all other workings of the non-profit. She is excited to learn about all the facets that make up this organization.

Meredith enjoys fashion photography, particularly how the images can capture the movement of the garment while emphasizing the stillness of the moment in which the photographs were taken. She is also inspired by any photography that challenges the viewers to delve deeper past the surface meaning. The photographs that confuse, offend, and challenge the viewers are the ones that leave a strong, lasting impression.

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