Posts Tagged “Nights at the PRC”

The theme for December’s Nights at the PRC, Identity and Portraiture, drew a broad range of presenters and lively participation from an audience of over 30 fellow photographers. Caleb Cole, the host for the evening, presented photos from his series “Other People’s Clothes,”  which is the product of his exploration of private moments of expectation and a visual expression of his experiences stepping into the shoes of the types of people he sees on a daily basis. Caleb also presented work from his new series “Blue Boys,” currently on view at Gallery Kayafas, which continues his exploration of how to visually express identity and personal experiences. Throughout the evening, six presenters shared their work related to the theme of Identity and Portraiture. Some photographers focused on traditional portraiture, while others presented work that questions how we identify ourselves or others through appearance, physical objects or location.

– Alyssa Minahan

Portrait & Identity Night

The evening’s host Caleb Cole.

Portrait & Identity Night

Presenter Renee Ricciardi.

Portrait & Identity Night

Caleb Cole commenting on a presenters work.

Below are some quotes from presenters about their experiences at December’s Nights at the PRC:

I came with specific questions regarding the presentation of my work and went home with some really good suggestions from Caleb and the group.” – Kathleen Gerdon Archer.  Kathleen is an honors graduate of Montsserat College College of Art with a BA in Painting, which has a had a profound influence on her photographic work. Her latest solo show was at The Carnery Gallery at Regis College in Weston, MA, with other solos shows at The Kingston Gallery, The Copley Society of Art and the Griffin Museum. Her work has also appeared in group shows at The Danforth Museum and Endicott College.

Nights at the PRC are a great opportunity to meet other photographers, get feedback and new ideas. This one was lots of fun, and it was a nice bonus to see Caleb’s recent work.” – Daniel Jackson. Daniel Jackson’s work has appeared in solo shows at the MIT Museum and Newton Free Library, as well as in group shows at the Griffin Museum, PhotoPlace Gallery and the PRC. His work is in the permanent collection of the MIT Museum, Griffin Museum of Photography and Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.

For me, Nights at the PRC are one of the most important functions of the year.” – Skip Schiel. A participatory photographer, photographing while engaging in struggles for justice, peace, right treatment of the environment, and enlightenment, Skip Schiel makes photos for publications, exhibits, slide shows, and individual use. His current projects include a photographic examination of conditions in Palestine & Israel, searching for the seeds of the new Detroit miracle, and Twilight, an exploration of light. Since 1990, Skip has taught at the Cambridge Center of Adult Education, ranging from basic photography to digital darkroom and photographic field workshops concentrating on light in photography. He has also taught photography at the Landscape Institute formerly at Harvard, the Quaker Palestine Youth Program in Palestine, filmmaking for 10 years at Boston College, and various workshops at Quaker gatherings.

 “I had been wanting to talk about my photographs that deal with the concept of identity for a long time. The PRC offers an excellent platform for photographers to show their work and discuss it with a group of local artists. I had never shown this identity series to anyone, but after the night at the PRC I was able to gather opinions, ideas, and useful feedback about the work.” – Renee Ricciardi. Renée Ricciardi is a Boston based artist and photographer. She received her Bachelors of Fine Arts in Photography from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design and is the 2013 Morton Godine Travel Fellowship recipient. Renée is currently working on a personal assignment photographing apiaries, beekeepers, and organic food in cities across Italy.

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By Phillip Jones

It’s impossible to live in a large city and not, at least to some degree, fall under its spell.  For some of us this fascination goes further and we find ourselves tramping down uncharted avenues searching for the city’s hidden secrets. Photographers, in particular, feel this tug.  Urban landscapes become the prime subject of their visual explorations.  In fact, the way we’ve come to perceive certain cities has been shaped by the artistic vision of the photographers that document them.  Paris has its Atgets, New York its Abbotts, Tokyo its Moriyamas, and so on. The cities keep growing and evolving, however, and each new generation of photographers naturally observe their surroundings with fresh eyes that replenish our understanding of the here and now.

Last night the PRC held its Urban Landscape Night here in the photogenic city of Boston as part of its ongoing Nights at the PRC program.  We looked at the portfolios of five urban photographers whose experience ranged from recent graduate to seasoned professional, but all of whom were dedicated and competent artists. Glenn Ruga, the PRC’s executive director, and I kicked off the evening with introductions, some observations about the urban landscape in general, and then we dove right into the presentations.  Each photographer had 20 minutes to present 20 images.  Three chose to lay their prints out on tables and two projected their work digitally.  I was asked to give the “official” feedback although the audience wasn’t shy about contributing input of their own.

(c) Randall Armor

Our first presenter was Randall Armor, who is a successful professional photographer, having shot commercial and editorial assignments for Lotus, Fidelity, Boston Magazine, and many others.  He is currently the director of the photography program for Boston University’s Center for Digital Imaging Arts.  This level of technical achievement and sophistication was evident in his many-faceted presentation.  His work had several subcategories including black-and-white street photography, nocturnal time-lapse photographs of moving trains, and complex incidental compositions utilizing signage, windows and reflections.  It was as if he’d curated a group show of urban photography but just happened to have taken all of the shots himself.  The work featured some real gems, and it’s a pleasure to see this skilled pro take a break from commercial assignments in order to follow his own paths of artistic inquiry, each of which seems rich with potential.

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